JOB SEARCH

 

 
 

Workstation Set-up

The following are some tips and advice on how you can modify your work station thereby reducing the risk of OH&S incidents in your workplace. This can be followed when changing location to a new workstation or when tasks are changed. It is important that different positions are tried to find the most comfortable arrangement for yourself.

Chair

Please refer to any instructions accompanying your chair or have someone show you how to use the controls. Try not to sit for long periods of time, and getting up for even 30 seconds every half an hour will provide relief.

  • Seat

Adjust chair height so that your feet are comfortably flat on the floor, thighs approximately horizontal and lower legs approximately vertical. If tilt is available, set to horizontal, although you may adjust it slightly forward.

OH&S chair height

 

Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria

  • Back Support

Raise the back rest to its maximum height, sit on the chair and check the fit of the back rest to the curve of the lower back. If not comfortable, lower the height and try this position. Repeat until the most comfortable position is found.

OH&S chair adjustment

 

Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria


Alter the forward/backward adjustment until a comfortable pressure is exerted on the low back area while seated. It should not feel as though it pushes you out of the seat nor that you have to lean back too far to reach it.

  • Arm Rests

Arm rests are not recommended unless they do not come into contact with the desk. If your chair does however have arm rests, make sure they allow you to get as close to the desk as required and do not impede on your elbows.

OH&S incorrect armrestsOH&S correct armrests

 

 Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria

Desk

  • Height

If you have a height adjustable desk, first adjust your chair to fit you and then adjust your desk so the top of the surface is just below elbow height.
If you don’t have an adjustable desk and the desk is higher or lower than your elbow you will have to modify it. If the desk is too high raise your chair by the difference and use a foot rest, or lower the desk by cutting the legs down. If the desk is too low, raise the height of the desk by extending the leg length (make sure secure and stable).

  • Clearance and Drawers

General items should not be stored under the desk where they will obstruct the space required by the legs. Items under the desk may cause the person to assume an awkward posture of the spine.
Frequently used items should be stored in the top draws to reduce bending and reaching. 

  • Storage on Desk

In-trays should be in the Outer Reach Sector of the desk and should not be located above shoulder height. Stationary should also be stored in the Outer Reach Sector. Heavy reference books and folders should be stored within close reach of a seated user or in a nearby position where the user has to stand to access them.

OH&S desk reach

 

Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria

Keyboard

Tilt the keyboard using the feet at the back to suit your level of comfort. Place the keyboard as close to the front edge of the desk as is comfortable. Do not place documents between the keyboard and the front edge of the desk as this increases the distance to the keyboard and may result in excessive head bending to look at the documents. Ensure there’s room to put the keyboard aside when not in use.

Mouse

Place the mouse mat directly beside the end of the keyboard on either side. Use the mouse in this position and try to keep the mouse on the mat while in use. If you use your mouse a lot, learn to use it with both hands so that you are able to swap for improved comfort.

OH&S desk reach2

 

Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria

VDU (Visual Display Units)

The screen should be positioned once the chair and desk heights have been established. It should be positioned so that the top of the screen is level with, or slightly lower than your eyes. The screen should first be placed so that it is approximately an arm’s length away from the usual seated position. If necessary move it further or closer as required. The screen should be placed in front of the user to avoid glare or reflections from windows.

OH&S screen height

 

Acknowledgement: Picture courtesy of "Officewise, A guide to health and safety on the office, " WorkSafe Victoria

Document Holders

A-frame style book rests that sit on top of the desk are the most practical and can be set at different angles. It is best placed so that it supports documents on an inclined angle between the keyboard and the screen. Place lever or swivel arm document holders directly beside the screen.

Telephone

The telephone should be placed either within or at the limit of the Optimum Reach Sector, depending on the amount of use. The placement should enable the user to operate the telephone without the need to move their trunk to grasp the handset or to operate the buttons.
When making a lot of calls, it may be best to place the telephone on the same side as the dominant hand so that this hand can comfortably operate the buttons. When mostly receiving calls, it may be more comfortable on the non-dominant side.
Where phone use is very often or for long periods, consider the use of a headset.

Angle Boards

An angle board can improve neck comfort where a job involves a lot of reading and handwriting. It should be placed immediately in front of the user on top of the desk.

 

Acknowledgement:
Worksafe Victoria, 1995, Officewise, A guide to health and safety in the office, Fifth Edition, Victorian Workcover Authority, Melbourne

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
 
 
Home | About Us | Job Search | Contractors | Employers | Job Seekers | Admin Login
Copyright © 2012 Jenny Barbour IT & Project Recruitment |
Privacy Policy